Category Archives: Front Gardens

The sloping land including the driveway in front of the house

Thursday 11th May 2017 – Front Garden

Thursday 11th May 2017 – Front Garden

The Iris this year have loved the lack of water. They have tolerated the dry conditions very well despite the ground being rock hard and the flowers are beautiful.

Iris in front garden

Iris in front garden

Iris in full bloom

Iris in full bloom

Iris

Iris

Iris planted last year 2016

Iris planted last year 2016

11th – 15th April 2017 – Phase 2 – Before And After Pictures Of Springdale

11th – 15th April 2017 – Phase 2

Before And After Pictures Of Springdale

front of house and drive 12.1.17

BEFORE – The front of Springdale house and drive 12.1.17

Springdale from the bottom of the drive

AFTER – Springdale from the bottom of the drive – 11th April 2017

Also see side by side photos at the bottom of this post

house and beam delivery

BEFORE – Springdale 12th January 2017

Springdale April 2017

AFTER – Springdale April 2017

front of house 12.1.17

BEFORE – Springdale – front of house 12.1.17

Springdale April 2017 picture 2

AFTER – Springdale April 2017 picture 2

Springdale April 2017 side view

Springdale April 2017 side view

Springdale April 2017 picture 3

Springdale April 2017 picture 3

Springdale April 2017 showing side dormer

Springdale April 2017 showing side dormer

Springdale from the road

Springdale from the road

Springdale from the road picture 2

Springdale from the road picture 2

The transformation is absolutely spectacular – we are so pleased with it.

Front Yew Hedge

Front Hedge

The Original Overgrown Hedge

The Original Overgrown Hedge

Front Hedge

The front hedge bordering onto Wyesham Road was a bit of a disaster! The little wall that has been built and front gate is a nice feature. However this continued into a very straggly and overgrown hedge, with many random plants, including ivy, holly, and many others all held together with a mass of brambles. Although the brambles were excellent for blackberries, of which we picked many, we decided it didn’t add to the appearance of Springdale and the garden, and we wanted the front to look good and look cared for!
With that in mind we looked into various possibilities: cutting the hedge well back and leaving it, cutting the hedge down and extending the wall, cutting the hedge down and putting up fencing, or cutting the hedge down and digging up as many roots as possible and replanting a new hedge.

Autumn 2014

Autumn 2014

December 2014

December 2014

Unexpectedly a birthday treat for my mother provided us with a great solution. My sister booked up for us to go to see Prince Charles’ garden, Highgrove. This was where we picked up many garden ideas, one of which was Yew hedges.

So out came the front hedge. It took many hours of hard digging to remove very well established roots.

Hedge removed 4.1.15

Hedge removed 4.1.15

The ground was thoroughly dug over a few times to remove as many roots as possible. In the coming year it will have to be carefully kept in check during the growing season, removing any regeneration of the old hedging plants.

Posts in wired up for hedge to be planted, February 2015

Posts in wired up for hedge to be planted, February 2015

Ground for new hedge from all angles from

Bare root Yew trees were purchased, enough for 3 plants per metre. (Taxus Baccata Hedging) Plants were 30 – 40 cm tall, but some of the specimens supplied were larger.  The ground was prepared as follows:  a trench was dug directly behind the newly wired fence; compost was added, and mixed in well with a sprinkle of bone meal.  Yew trees, however, will not tolerate waterlogged ground.

 

A single bare root plant

A single bare root plant

Then trees were laid in place and as each tree was planted the roots were spread out so they were adjacent to the fence.  Each tree was firmed in place using a booted foot, coming out from the tree like the rays of the sun.  Each tree was then well watered.

Yew Trees planted

Yew Trees planted

View of Yew Hedge from the road

View of Yew Hedge from the road

After research, we discovered that Yew hedges are very versatile and there are many benefits of using these plants.  Yew hedge plants will eventually create a dense hedge and grow 20-40cm a year.
They are evergreen, provide a good screening and help reduce noise; they are low maintenance and can tolerate quite hard pruning, and can be shaped, even with little window holes, as at Highgrove; they are good for wildlife, both food and shelter; and they live for many years and will outlast other conifer hedge varieties. Also planting a Yew hedge is far more economical as they cost far less than building a wall.

Hedge from the roadside

Hedge from the roadside

My brother-in-law and sister have had great success with the Yew hedge having used them in previous gardens on a number of occasions and these hedges are still growing well today.

Yew hedge from inside garden

Yew hedge from inside garden

A portion of front Yew hedge

A portion of front Yew hedge

Finally to give the hedge a good start an extra fence was put in place on the roadside to give the hedge extra protection. This is just a temporary measure and will be removed when the Yew hedge starts to thicken up and becomes well established.

Extra fence in place

Extra fence in place

Yew Hedge fenced in by wall

Yew Hedge fenced up to wall

Yew Hedge February 2015

Yew Hedge February 2015

Finished Front Yew Hedge February 2015

Finished Front Yew Hedge February 2015

Bareroot plants are usually available between November and March but rootballs are available all year and can be planted anytime.

Interestingly scientists have also discovered that Yew contains a chemical called Taxol that can be used in the treatment of cancer.  Trimmings of fresh growth of yew can be collected for extraction of the chemical as we discovered from Highgrove.

What Has Happened To The Front Hedge?

October 2014

The Neglected Front Hedge – to read the whole story please click on the Front Yew Hedge tab.

The Original Overgrown Hedge

The Original Overgrown Hedge

Above is a photo of the original hedge in the front garden.  A very overgrown affair!  It has now had quite a makeover.

View of Yew Hedge from the road, February 2015

View of Yew Hedge from the road, February 2015

To find out more click on the Front Yew Hedge Page